MBTI® Test INFJ Curator

Strong Interest Inventory® General Occupational Theme Code: Enterprising, Conventional (EC) (GOT)

A career as a curator is often incredibly rewarding and specialized, meaning that it takes a certain type of person to feel fulfilled in this field. More specifically, much like other occupations, there are specific Myers Briggs Type Indicator® (Myers-Briggs test) personality types that align well with the role of a curator. The imaginative and ambitious Introverted-Intuitive-Feeling-Judging (INFJ) MBTI test types are often one of these MBTI types that fit well in the role of a curator.

Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Succeeding in a career as a curator, depending on the type of museum or institution in which one works, involves a variety of different duties. For example, curators will often create and develop artistic or historical collections and exhibits, showcasing artwork, historically significant objects, or scientific developments in order to bring this information and culture to the masses. Occasionally, their duties go beyond the walls of the museum or other gallery, and they take up roles as educators, researchers, or community service facilitators. Curators are involved from the very beginning of an art exhibition, starting with the act of acquiring the pieces all the way through storage and designing how the pieces will be displayed.

When they aren’t working explicitly with artwork or objects, curators are often working on the more administrative side of the institution, such as through developing grant proposals or other documents for publication, acquiring new pieces through negotiations, conducting tours of the facility, and publicizing their institution through attending various meetings and conferences. In many cases, they are also responsible for maintaining the museum itself, including climate, pest, and facilities issues that need to be addressed in order to assure the proper maintenance of the many artifacts on display and in storage.

Curators use a wide variety of different tools in their careers, including digital and film cameras, scanners, screw drivers, and many more. They also need to be comfortable using Microsoft Office Suite (including Word, Powerpoint, Excel, and Publisher) and email servers, in addition to publishing software (e.g., Adobe InDesign), graphics software (e.g., Adobe Photoshop), and project management software (e.g., Eloquent Systems). To excel as a curator, individuals must have considerable knowledge of history, archaeology, art history, fine arts, sociology, media, and administration. They must also be successful public speakers and educators, as they will oftentimes be discussing various pieces of artistic and historical significance with those who are unaware of their importance. Critical thinking and reasoning are also important for this occupation, as is an artistic eye and adept writing skills. Of course, creativity is also a huge part of being a curator.

Below are some employment trends for Curators’:

  • Median wage: $24.30 hourly, $50,550 annually
  • Employment: 11,000 employees
  • Projected growth (2012-2022): Average (8%-14%)
  • Projected job openings (2012-2022): 3,900

Visit Our Strong Interest Inventory® Resource Page To Learn About The EC GOT

Visit Our MBTI® About Page and Our INFJ Personality Type Page For Detailed Information on The INFJ Personality Type

INFJ Careers

Click on one of these corresponding popular INFJ Careers for detailed information including Career Stats, Daily Tasks and Required Education:Clinical Psychologists, Curator, Dentist, Desktop Publisher, Editor, Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational Counselors, Fashion Designers, Graphic Designers, Healthcare Social Workers, and Pediatricians

 

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Explore Our INFJ Blog Pages

Explore additional information that delves deeper into the INFJ Personality Type by examining various personality and career based subjects:

Click on a link below to read more about different MBTI Personality Types

ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics wage data and 2012-2022 employment projections Onetonline.org

MBTI® Type Tables for Occupations, 2nd Edition. Schaubhut, N. & Thompson, R. (CPP, 2008)