ESTJ Personality Type – Extraverted Thinking with Introverted Sensing

The eleventh of the personality types (as outlined by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® Assessment, or MBTI® Test) is the Extraverted Thinking with Introverted Sensing type. Those who exhibit the ESTJ personality type are unbiased, discerning, detailed and empirical. They succeed most in situations where they must discover an already established solution to a present issue. Myers-Briggs® Test-assessed ESTJ types find themselves often living in the “now”, choosing to believe in what is happening around them and what they have discovered is empirically sound. With such a drive to find solutions for problems and their go-getter attitude, ESTJ types have several desirable skills as employees:

  • Skilled at managing and coordinating different endeavors, and use their skills to work toward completing that scheme
  • Work well in group settings where their partners/participants are accountable and pull their own weight
  • Succeed in leadership or administrative positions because they have an innate ability to understand how things work internally, such as the hierarchy of a company
  • Can see projects’ timelines from the get-go, as well as how they will develop and grow, including any probable issues that may arise within the ESTJ types carefully concocted plan
  •  If something isn’t giving them the solution that they were looking for, they will devise a new way to come to that solution, even though they prefer pre-standing standards

Well-Organized Information Sponges

MBTI Types Build ConfidenceMBTI Test -assessed ESTJ personality types enjoy surrounding themselves with others of similar levels of intelligence, aptitude, and proficiency, and try their best to exhibit their vast knowledge in their careers and personal lives. They are systemized in work and in play, and are always looking for a way to apply their knowledge.

Individuals with the ESTJ personality type hold their morals and beliefs very dear to them and do everything in their power to follow them—also wishing for their peers to do the same. They are conclusive, sensible, commonsensical, and reasonable. They enjoy instant fulfillment from their enterprises, and are always ready to take on a leadership role, taking their authority seriously.

As leaders (and as peers), Myers-Briggs test ESTJ type individuals find pleasure in being around other people, whether this includes in a work meeting, in some friendly competition, at a familial outing, or in another fun activity that involves human interaction. They are often incredibly open and honest, so their friends and coworkers never need to wonder if there is an underlying meaning behind their words. Others often allow the ESTJ personality type to fulfill their natural leadership roles and watch as the ESTJ takes control of a situation.

The ESTJ Can be Overwhelming to Peers

Occasionally, their need to fulfill these positions of authority can make the ESTJ personality type overwhelming to their peers, with these people not understanding how the ESTJ type can be so sure of themselves and the plans that they choose to take. Similarly, if the plans of the ESTJ type are not as strictly adhered to as they would like, they can become irritated with those who have any level of doubt about their ideas.

ESTJ personality types aren’t always the best at expressing their emotions or being aware of another’s. Occasionally, the MBTI test -assessed ESTJ type individual can find it difficult to appraise or assess current situations, people, or opinions, making them seem unsympathetic or insensitive. Also, especially when appraisal is needed by another, or if a peer is seeking advice, the ESTJ type may disregard their peer’s feelings, seeing them as unnecessary to the situation that is currently occurring.

Another problem that individuals with the ESTJ type preference can run into is that they are occasionally ostentatious about their levels of knowledge, not allowing others to put in their two cents. Similarly, with this over-confidence in their own abilities, Myers-Briggs Test ESTJ types can rush to conclusions without surveying all of the knowledge available to them, trusting too much in their own level of intelligence to worry about anything else. With a slightly heightened awareness of how emotions can come into play, along with a consciousness of their confidence in themselves, individuals with the ESTJ personality type can work towards becoming a more modest and well-rounded employees.

[Personality type information was referenced from the following publication- (Isabel Briggs Myers, 1998, CPP Inc.)]

Ideal Careers for the ESTJ type

"Image courtesy of Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net".

“Image courtesy of Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net”.

MBTI test ESTJ types are successful in a wide variety of fields, such as technology, agriculture, business, and production, especially those where they may be placed in a leadership position. Executive positions are common, as are supervisory occupations such as manager of agricultural workers, mechanic supervisor, industrial production manager, or a manager of building maintenance. MBTI test-assessed ESTJ types also often find themselves in counseling or law positions where their empirical-centered minds are challenged and solutions can be found. This includes occupations such as financial counselor or judge. Other common occupations include infantry member, civil engineer, sales manager, and electrician (Allen L. Hammer, 1993, CPP Inc.).

In order to become the most well rounded employee that an ESTJ can be, it is important for them to broaden their focus away from the immediate satisfaction that comes on a per-project basis, and instead create goals for themselves that stretch beyond the present.

Also, for success in the professional world and in their personal lives, the ESTJ type must step outside of the fact- and intelligence-based world in which they are so comfortable and focus more of their attention towards what is important to them, regardless of whether or not they feel it is sensible or reasonable. Allowing their emotions to come into play will make them more sympathetic to their peers and will humanize them.

Similarly, by assessing all of the different dynamics of their projects and issues, they can stop themselves from making hurried choices based only off of facts that they feel confident about, and can instead use their thoughts and feelings together to find answers. By opening their minds to emotions and their own long-term goals, the ESTJ type individual can be better prepared to work in the world around them.

ESTJ Careers

Click on one of these corresponding popular ESTJ Careers for detailed information including Career Stats, Income Stats, Daily Tasks and Required Education: Auditor, Commercial Pilot, Computer-ATM-Office Machine Repairer, Construction Manager, Correctional Officer & Jailer, Criminal Investigator, Home Health Aide, Personal Financial AdvisorPolice & Fire & Ambulance Dispatcher, Sheriff & Deputy Sheriff.

Discover your best fit career with The MBTI® Career Report below or continue reading for more information regarding ESTJs including Leadership & Learning styles as well as Emotional Intelligence.

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Further Understanding ESTJs

ESTJs are among the most organized personality types. They live by a clear set of standards and beliefs, and value competence, efficiency, and results above all else. They tend to be highly practical and systematic, focusing on the present and what is realistic to accomplish immediately and efficiently. For this reason, they tend to make excellent administrators; they also have a proclivity for systems and logistics, and are able to consider multiple interrelated aspects of a problem simultaneously and reconcile them so that they can work synergistically with one another.

While ESTJs do enjoy interpersonal interaction, it is of the utmost importance to them that others, especially those in their professional teams or departments have the same high standards and attention to detail as they do—they have little patience with confusion or the incompetence of others. As such, others may perceive Myers-Briggs® ESTJs to be overly confident, sometimes bordering on arrogant. Nonetheless, they are known to be dependable and conscientious individuals who take their responsibilities seriously. That said, ESTJs may wish to make an effort to respond more considerately to the emotional needs of others, as well as well as to begin to consider in a more flexible manner the possible implications or unintended side-effects of a particular decision or action.

ESTJs’ Learning Style: Analytical and Decisive

ESTJs are highly organized, analytical, and decisive individuals. When confronted with a problem, they quickly analyze it, take control, and mobilize others to solve it immediately. They prefer learning information that is directly linked to results, and they pride themselves on efficiency above all else. In the classroom, they benefit from instructors and trainers who communicate clear goals, so they can see the ending destination before they set out. They also tend to learn by asking questions, and so they benefit from having educators who are comfortable with, rather than threatened by, constant questioning and curiosity. Along the same lines, it is important to them that their instructors are highly knowledgeable, and who are able to present their sources for particular information, and who can make explicit connections between their content and the real world. MBTI® ESTJs are highly critical, and these connections are essential for them to be able to internalize and value information.

ESTJ Type Photo

Learn about The MBTI® ESTJ’s Learning, Leadership and Emotional Outlook styles

ESTJs are not known for their patience, and they may get frustrated with instructors or peers who are particularly long-winded, or when they are not as motivated or organized as they are. That said, they do benefit from discussions and group learning experiences that are challenging and engaging, especially when they are able to be given leadership roles or where they can establish their own organization within their learning environment. ESTJs also excel in competitive environments, focusing on the success of their output, whether this is in achieving the highest grade on an exam or completing a given task in the shortest amount of time. Part of their fulfillment and feeling of accomplishment comes from being more productive than their peers. A friendly competition fulfills this need.

When it comes to feedback, ESTJs prefer explicit, timely feedback that clearly evaluates their work, and points out areas of improvement. They tend to dislike feedback that is subjective, unstructured, or that is directed towards large groups rather than their own individual performance.

ESTJs’ Leadership Style: Efficient and Focused

ESTJs are focused, efficient, objective leaders. They are able to divorce personal relationships from workplace relationships, and are able to like an individual while still not wanting to work with them if they do not actively contribute to the team’s performance or the organization’s bottom line. They decide on goals and a direction quickly, and are able to identify and articulate intermediate objectives quickly and thoroughly. They are highly practical, and are able to modify plans depending on changing circumstances whenever necessary. However, because they tend to be highly focused and opinionated, and have little patience with explaining their positions to those who do not intuitively understand, ESTJ leaders may have difficulty articulating their positions clearly in a way that can change others’ minds or that can inspire a broad and diverse audience. In general, they expect that their position will be so self-evident as to necessitate minimal explanation, thinking instead that the results will speak for themselves.

Once they reach a decision, ESTJs focus on their goal exclusively, often ignoring peripheral information or context. However, they are among the most efficient deployers of human, material, and pecuniary resources, and are able to consider the long-term payoff of individual investment decisions with ease. In addition, ESTJs tend to consider deadlines, bureaucracy, and organizational structure highly important. While this makes ESTJs in some ways ideal for reporting to higher institutional levels, it may make it difficult for ESTJs to work with other individuals with different personality types who may prefer a more flexible work environment.

As ESTJs continue to grow and develop as leaders, they may make an effort to promote collaboration on their teams and to consider more carefully others’ input and opinions. They should also make an effort to experiment with styles and organization, and remember that the environment that may be optimal or preferable for them as individuals may not actually be ideal for the entire team. As such, encouraging feedback and input from others can be instrumental. An additional area of growth is for ESTJs to make a concerted effort to developing their interpersonal style – for relating to others’ emotional needs and to structuring a workplace environment in which those needs can be met more easily.

ESTJs and Emotional Outlook: Decisive and Structured

ESTJs tend to be highly confident and masterful at identifying goals and structuring and implementing plans to attain those goals. However, they are less certain of how to handle more emotionally-charged or interpersonal situations that may emerge from working with teams of individuals. Nonetheless, regardless of their task at hand—from completing a project to handling another co-worker’s emotional state—ESTJs tend to be highly aware and realistic in their sense of their own capabilities and competencies. In other words, they tend to have a sensitivity to what they can achieve. This awareness feeds into their ability to control their own impulses and to direct their energy in ways that will enable them to achieve and fulfill tasks as efficiently as possible. ESTJs are highly independent and dependable individuals, and rarely get distracted by their emotional state. Instead, they experience emotional satisfaction in their pride of achieving their goals and in their professional discipline and management style. Nothing makes ESTJs quite as happy or fulfilled as a job well done. They love meeting a challenge successfully and efficiently, and genuinely enjoy this sense of achievement.

ESTJ Type Photo 2

Learn about The MBTI® ESTJ Personality Type’s Emotional Outlook & Emotional Intelligence

On the other hand, ESTJs may feel stressed or out of control when circumstances or expectations are constantly changing. From their perspective, it is impossible to aim if the target is continuously moving. Instead, they prefer to work in predictable environments, and appreciate the ability to implement plans that have already been agreed upon. This proclivity also goes along with their tendency to prefer structure—ESTJs can handle variation within a particular expected range that can be accounted for in an initial plan. This way, contingencies have been considered in advance, and goals remain unchanged. This definition of long-term and short-term goals helps keep ESTJs motivated. When they do get overly stressed, ESTJs often find stress relief in physical activity and in social networks. They tend to have large friend circles, and also tend to keep themselves in good physical condition.

In terms of their relationships with others, ESTJs may at times be so focused on the task at hand that they remain oblivious to others’ social or emotional needs. That said, they are trustworthy and make a concerted effort to build that trust by repeatedly demonstrating their reliability and dependability. ESTJs take commitments very seriously, and rarely agree to do something, regardless of how trivial or insignificant it may seem, unless they are completely dedicated to fulfilling it. That said, they tend to place a low value on others’ opinions of them. Their behavior is more focused on fulfilling their word because they consider it important in and of itself rather than as a means to an end.

In terms of improvement, ESTJs may wish to make an effort to focus more of their time on considering larger contextual factors and incorporating them into their decision making. Sometimes factors that may seem peripheral or insignificant may turn out to be the most important of all. One peripheral consideration is the feelings of others. ESTJs should attempt to demonstrate empathy for others and their situation; they may be surprised at the impact that a simple compliment or a more supportive environment can have on one of their team member’s production. By considering these interpersonal relationships more, they will be able to build a more supportive environment for more sensitive individuals, and ultimately improve their contributions to the bottom line of the company as well.

Learn More About the MBTI ESTJ Personality Type

Explore additional information that delves deeper into the ESTJ Personality Type by examining various personality and career based subjects:

Click on a link below to read more about different MBTI Personality Types

ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ

References

Introduction to Type (Isabel Briggs Myers, 1998, CPP Inc.)

Introduction to Type and Careers (Allen L. Hammer, 2007, CPP Inc.)

Introduction to Type and Leadership (Richmond, S. CPP. 2008)

Introduction to Type and Learning (Dunning, D. CPP. 2008)

Introduction To Type® and Emotional Intelligence. (Pearman, R. CPP, 2002)