MBTI® Test ISTP Light Truck or Delivery Drivers

Strong Interest Inventory® General Occupational Theme Code: Realistic, Conventional (RC)

Knowing your Myers-Briggs Test Personality Type can help you find a career that capitalizes on your strengths and innate qualities. Hammer (1996) notes that MBTI test ISTP’s enjoy working outdoors, enjoy immediate, tangible goals, and have strong analytical and problem solving skills. People with these fortes can often match well in careers such as light truck or delivery service drivers.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Delivery drivers operate trucks or vans primarily to pick up or deliver merchandise or packages. To do so, they must have a strong understanding of and ability to obey local and state traffic laws and procedures, as well as the physical ability to load and unload packages or goods. They must also have strong visual-spatial map reading skills, and be able to follow verbal or written directions to and from specific locations. In order to confirm the proper delivery of goods, such drivers may also need to maintain records of cargo, billing statements, or vehicle logs to comply with local, state, or federal regulations, and submit the necessary receipts or records to their supervisors. Last but not least, delivery drivers may need to be able to inspect their vehicles and gauge their working conditions, perhaps by gauging the gas, lights, brakes, tires, or other parts to ensure proper working conditions.

Being a successful delivery driver involves the use of a variety of tools and vehicles. Obviously, the ability to operate the truck or van itself is important. In addition, drivers may need to use a forklift to load or unload their vehicle, a Global Positioning System (GPS) to deliver their cargo to the proper location, and a portable data input terminal, which is essentially an electronic keyboard on which clients can confirm their receipt of a good or package. In order to maintain proper records of goods and cargo, their whereabouts, and their status, delivery drivers may also need to use industrial control software such as FreightDATA or inventory management software.

Because cargo must be delivered in a timely, organized fashion, delivery drivers require strong monitoring and time management skills. They need to be able to keep track of their own actions and be able to accurately and precisely report them to their superiors. They also need a strong grounding in the English language, and in customer and personal service so they can provide adequate assistance to ensure customer satisfaction.

Because the majority of truck drivers are able to “learn on the job”, these positions generally only require a high school diploma. Most hiring managers still prefer some kind of previous work experience, particularly in a job involving significant customer contact. After hiring, there may also be a period of apprenticeship, in which a new hire is paired with a more experienced mentor in order to become more familiar with the expectations and procedures of the job.

Myers-Briggs test ISTP’s are exceptional in delivery driving careers because they function well with a high degree of independence, and because the constant travel keeps them active and outdoors and results in a tangible result at the end of the workday.

Below find employment trends for Light Truck or Delivery Drivers:

  • Median wage: $14.02 hourly, $29,170 annually
  • Employment: 842,000 employees
  • Projected growth (2012-2022): Slower than average (3%-7%)
  • Projected job openings (2012-2022): 166,600

Visit Our MBTI® About Page and Our ISTP Personality Type Page for Detailed Information on The ISTP Personality Type

Visit Our Strong Interest Inventory® Resource Page to Learn About the RC GOT

ISTP Careers

Click on one of these corresponding popular ISTP Careers for detailed information including Career Stats, Income Stats, Daily Tasks and Required Education: Agricultural Inspector, Automotive Master Mechanic, Avionics Technician, Civil Engineering Technician, Construction & Building Inspector, Electric Power-Line Installer & Repairer, Forest & Conservation Worker, Light Truck or Delivery Driver, Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanic, and Operating Engineer or Other Construction Equipment Operator.

 

  • Sale!

    MBTI® Career Report

    $49.50 $44.50 Add to cart

    Find your best occupational match with this easy-to-read Myers-Briggs® test graphic report

    Choosing a career path can be difficult. The revised MBTI® Career Report helps point the way by showing you how your type affects your career exploration and discusses the benefits of choosing a job that is a good fit for your type. By taking the Myers-Briggs test  you also explore preferred work tasks and work environments—as well as most popular and least popular occupations—for any type and receive strategies for improving job satisfaction. This completely updated report includes expanded coverage of popular fields such as business, health care, computer technology, and high-level executive and management occupations. It is based on four-letter type results and can be generated using your reported type or verified type.

    Download sample MBTI® Career Report

 

Learn More About the MBTI ISTP Personality Type

Explore additional information that delves deeper into the ISTP Personality Type by examining various personality and career based subjects:

Click on a link below to read more about different MBTI Personality Types

ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ

References:

  1. Bureau of Labor Statistics wage data and 2012-2022 employment projections Onetonline.org
  1. MBTI® Type Tables for Occupations, 2nd Edition. Schaubhut, N. & Thompson, R. (CPP, 2008)
  1. Introduction To Type and Careers. Hammer, A. (CPP, 1996).