MBTI® Test INFJ Dentist

Strong Interest Inventory® General Occupational Theme Code: Investigative, Realistic, Social (IRS) (GOT)

Excelling in a career as a dentist takes skill, constant continuing education, and the personality to go with it. While many may think that the latter of these is not important, one’s Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI® test) personality type can have a great effect on one’s sustainability at their job. For example, the listening, caring, organized, and sensitive nature of the Introverted-Intuitive-Feeling-Judging (INFJ) Myers-Briggs test types helps such person’s function quite comfortably in the dental field as dentists.

Image courtesy of dream designs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of dream designs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

An occupation as a dentist requires more than just cleaning teeth—in fact, dentists work much as a doctor would, diagnosing any medical issues that may arise in the teeth, gums, mouth and jaw, pertaining to dental tissues, nerves, teeth, and other components of dental hygiene. Along with checking teeth for cavities, malformations, breakage, and disease, dentists also fit dental apparatuses designed to help prevent further damage to one’s teeth. Depending on the patient, dentists could perform tasks ranging from administering anesthetics, performing dental examinations, reviewing x-rays, developing treatment plans, treating gum disease or other oral diseases, discussing preventative care with patients, writing prescriptions, and developing prosthodontics mechanisms.

A career as a dentist requires knowledge of several subjects and tools. Dentists are required to know their way around dental probes and forceps, as well as any new technology as it develops. Many dentists, especially those with their own practices, also need to be comfortable using accounting software, web browsers, and of course medical software (e.g., AlphaDent; DentiMax; Windent SQL, etc.) in order to ensure that the managerial and logistical aspects of their practice also run smoothly.

Of course, a background in biology, medicine, chemistry, and psychology is also imperative to this work environment. Depending on if the dentist owns his or her own practice, further knowledge is required, including managerial skills, accounting, and human resources. Extremely important as well, customer service skills are necessary to keep patients coming in, feeling welcome, and referring new patients. Other important skills include making judgment calls on treatment, solving problems related to oral hygiene and various diseases, and physical skills such as coordination and dexterity. Finally, strong communication skills, both orally and in writing, are absolutely necessary to communicate with patients and staff, as well as to complete the necessary exams and professional development required for certification as a dentist. In extreme cases, a basic knowledge of the law, especially laws relating to medicine or medical malpractice, can be beneficial. Because of the medical nature of this occupation, a doctoral or professional degree is almost always required.

Below are some employment trends for Dentists:

  • Median wage: $70.36 hourly, $146,340 annually
  • Employment: 126,000 employees
  • Projected growth (2012-2022): Faster than average (15%-21%)
  • Projected job openings (2012-2022): 51,200

Visit Our Strong Interest Inventory® Resource Page To Learn About The IRS GOT

Visit Our MBTI® About Page and Our INFJ Personality Type Page For Detailed Information on The INFJ Personality Type

INFJ Careers

Click on one of these corresponding popular INFJ Careers for detailed information including Career Stats, Daily Tasks and Required Education:Clinical Psychologists, Curator, Dentist, Desktop Publisher, Editor, Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational Counselors, Fashion Designers, Graphic Designers, Healthcare Social Workers, and Pediatricians

 

  • MBTI® Career Report

    $49.95 Add to cart

    Find your best occupational match with this easy-to-read Myers-Briggs® test graphic report

    Choosing a career path can be difficult. The revised MBTI® Career Report helps point the way by showing you how your type affects your career exploration and discusses the benefits of choosing a job that is a good fit for your type. By taking the Myers-Briggs test  you also explore preferred work tasks and work environments—as well as most popular and least popular occupations—for any type and receive strategies for improving job satisfaction. This completely updated report includes expanded coverage of popular fields such as business, health care, computer technology, and high-level executive and management occupations. It is based on four-letter type results and can be generated using your reported type or verified type.

    Download sample MBTI® Career Report

 

Explore Our INFJ Blog Pages

Explore additional information that delves deeper into the INFJ Personality Type by examining various personality and career based subjects:

Click on a link below to read more about different MBTI Personality Types

ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics wage data and 2012-2022 employment projections Onetonline.org

MBTI® Type Tables for Occupations, 2nd Edition. Schaubhut, N. & Thompson, R. (CPP, 2008)