MBTI® Test ESTP Freight Handlers

Strong Interest Inventory® General Occupational Theme Code: Realistic (R) (GOT)

Knowing your Myers-Briggs Personality Type can help you find a career that will let you build on the talents you already have. Hammer (1996) writes that Extroverted-Sensing-Thinking-Perceiving (ESTP) MBTI test types naturally have a keen attention to detail and enjoy working with their hands. They like knowing that they are making progress towards long-term and short-term goals. These innate preferences, among others, can make  Myers-Briggs Personality Type ESTP’s often excel in careers such as freight handlers.

Image courtesy of hywards at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of hywards at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Freight Handlers are responsible for manually moving materials or freight from one place to another, often among loading docks, production facilities, delivery vehicles, or sales shelves. As they do this, they often need to sort and inventory their cargo and mark them with information that identifies what it is, where it comes from, and where it needs to go. This can be done digitally with bar codes, or, more traditionally, with physical tags or labels that contain identifying information. Additionally, freight handlers need to be able to read and interpret written or oral work orders and make judgments to determine the optimal strategy or approach for completing their designated tasks. In some cases, freight handlers may need to make tweaks to their work environment, including installing protective devices, shovel material, connect electrical equipment, and so on, to keep their area functioning optimally.

In order to accomplish these tasks successfully, freight handlers use a variety of different tools and machines, including forklifts, hammers, hoists, pulleys, pallet trucks, track cranes, and wrapping or banding machinery. They also often wear protective clothing, including gloves, aprons, hard hats, and strong boots. Being physically fit for this kind of career is also indispensable in order to be able to work efficiently and effectively. A variety of different kinds of software, including database or data entry software, machine control software, inventory tracking software, and spreadsheet software are necessary, along with word processing, email, and messaging programs.

While being a freight handler does not require any specialized knowledge or skills that cannot be picked up on the job, manual dexterity, bodily strength, and physical coordination are all of the utmost importance. These characteristics, if developed, can greatly reduce the probability of a dangerous mishap in the workplace, especially when heavy loads, precise movements, or high stakes are involved.

While some 70% of freight handlers do hold a high school diploma, nearly 20% do not. A small minority—roughly 5%—have attended some level of college. However, rather than achieving advanced degrees, for this position, being able to communicate with one’s co-workers and supervisors, and learn quickly and efficiently on-the-job is incredibly important.

Below are some employment trends for Freight Handlers:

  • Median wage: $11.74 hourly, $24,430 annually
  • Employment: 2,197,000 employees
  • Projected growth (2012-2022): Average (8% to 14%)
  • Projected job openings (2012-2022): 922,500

Visit Our MBTI® About Page and Our ESTP Personality Type Page For Detailed Information on The ESTP Personality Type

Visit Our Strong Interest Inventory® Resource Page To Learn About The Realistic GOT

ESTP Careers

Click on one of these corresponding popular ESTP Careers for detailed information including Career Stats, Income Stats, Daily Tasks and Required Education: Automotive Specialty Technician, Construction Laborer, Counter and rental clerk, Electrician, Farm and Ranch Managers, Firefighters, Freight Handler, Loan Officer, Restaurant Cook and Construction supervisors.

 

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Explore Our ESTP Blog Pages

Explore additional information that delves deeper into the ESTP Personality Type by examining various personality and career based subjects:

Click on a link below to read more about different MBTI Personality Types

ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ

 

References:

  1. Bureau of Labor Statistics wage data and 2012-2022 employment projections Onetonline.org
  1. MBTI® Type Tables for Occupations, 2nd Edition. Schaubhut, N. & Thompson, R. (CPP, 2008)
  1. Introduction To Type and Careers, Hammer, A. (CPP, 1996)