The MBTI® Test ISFP Personality Type and Innovation

Taylor MicaelaBlogs, Innovation, ISFP, MBTI, Personality Type

ISFP personality type thinking up innovation

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ISFP Personality Type and Innovation

Creativity manifests itself in different ways, and each Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® personality type has its own specific roles and preferences when it comes to innovating. From whether they enjoy dreaming up creative solutions to whether they prefer physically creating something new, your MBTI Test personality type can tell you a lot about your creative process. For example, check out how the Introverted Feeling with Extraverted Sensing (ISFP) MBTI® type utilizes its creativity into developing something new or improved.

For clarification, we will define innovation as “the implementation of ideas.” (Killen and Williams, 2009, CPP) ISFP personality types are great problem-solvers, thinking of inventive ways to either make something easier or save time and energy. When working in groups while innovating, ISFP types are incredibly encouraging and accommodating of their peers’ abilities and ideas. A slight lack of confidence in their innovation abilities often means that ISFP types prefer that someone else takes the reigns when it comes to innovating, choosing instead to work on a task or job assigned to them based on their strengths in that area. (Killen and Williams, 2009, CPP)

Instead of creating something new out of nothing, ISFP personality types prefer to work on innovations that involve tweaking an already existing product or process to make it better and more efficient. Their independent nature means that most of their innovations occur when they are alone, where they can make sure that what they propose will work before allowing others to see and critique it. They are adaptable to changes in the innovative process, taking each new development into consideration as they continue developing ideas. (Killen and Williams, 2009, CPP)

An ISFP Types abilities can be their best asset and their worst enemy. They can often be tough on themselves, seeing themselves as ineffective innovators and believing that their role in the innovative process is less important than others that they are working with. They can also be tough on others if they feel they are not fulfilling their individual duties, which can cause tension in the group. (Killen and Williams, 2009, CPP)

ISFP types may have issues with voicing their opinions to others, fearing that they will be judged in a difficult or multifaceted situation. The best things that others can do for MBTI ISFP types is to offer positive reinforcement for their ideas and creations, while still allowing them to work independently on formulating these ideas and at their own pace. (Killen and Williams, 2009, CPP)

To become better innovators, MBTI Test ISFP personality types should try being more open to faults, both their own and those of others. Allowing reason and logic to run their innovation can lead to a roadblock in creativity. Thinking outside the box, confronting problems straight on, and placing more trust in oneself can really help ISFP types to open their mind to innovation and keep the innovative process rolling seamlessly. By implementing these changes and by continuing their support for others that are helping them, ISFP types can apply their logical minds to more innovation. (Killen and Williams, 2009, CPP)

References

Introduction to Type and Innovation. (Damien Killen & Gareth Williams, 2009, CPP Inc.)

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